On the usual Tuesday afternoon, I spend an average of three hours waiting.

I wait in the Neyland-Thompson Sports Complex to interview UT football

players and coaches.

But unlike a line at an amusement park, the wait is never worth the effort.

It is not that I do not like waiting for the UT football crew, because it

is a fundamental part of my job, one which I enjoy.

I am one of the first to hear Fulmer's prognostication on the upcoming

game, one of the first to hear Tee humbly provide details of his great

plays and honestly recall the pain of his defeats, and I am fortunate to

spend a few minutes each week with Spencer Riley, a man too candid to ever

hold a government job.

Yet, as fortunate as I am, there are still problems. Many of the UT players

and coaching staff seem to think of media day in the same light I thought

of high school study hall, a repetitive bore. Consequently, their

attendance is about as stellar as mine was in study hall.

In all fairness to the team, I hardly believe that the players are out in

the woods sneaking a cigarette or running off to Burger King for an illegal

Whopper.

Nevertheless, their absenteeism makes the reporter's job difficult and

often times frustrating. I try to avoid editorializing, but in a situation

where quotes are as elusive as a UT bike cop, the situation can become

grave.

But, this week the Vols will rest and prepare for the upcoming battle with

Alabama. Hence, I had an opportunity to relax on Tuesday and ponder of few

of the current events that constitute the landscape of sports.

What curse?

The Red Sox may have finally nixed the horrific curse of the Bambino

when they beat the Cleveland Indians to face the New York Yankees in the

ALCS.

In the National League, the, surprise, Atlanta Braves are facing the

up-and-coming New York Mets.

Despite the astronomical odds, I am hoping to see a Mets vs. Red Sox World

Series. The media blitz that would accompany an all-New York series would

rival the Joey Buttafuoco drama and would certainly keep me tuned out.

The new WWF

The NBA started their preseason schedule recently and I don't care. The

way the rules are set up in this terrible league, the games have come to

more closely resemble a professional wrestling match than a basketball

game.

A few suggestions to whoever is in charge of the fledgling league: zone

defense is a great thing that can equalize a great player's ability to

dominate; in fact, any defense would be a welcome change.